November 21, 2016

Why Does the Color of Medicine Matter?

Filed under: color,health — Tags: , , , — jpestano @ 10:04 pm

Colors

The practice of color coding has an impact on a patient’s psychology. Patients tend to associate the color and shape of a pill with the healing effects of the medication.

It is common for humans to form judgments based on color. Even though it makes no logical sense, the accumulation of experiences and emotions often dictate how people interact with the uses of a product.  For example, yellow is usually associated with optimism or happiness, so brands like McDonalds or SunRype capitalize on this perception. This psychological effect also carries over to the process of self-administrating drugs. Whether it is chewing a tablet, swallowing a pill or drinking a liquid, the color of the substance becomes a significant reminder of the sensory experience that corresponds to ingesting that drug.

This phenomenon is well-known in color psychology. Your brain attributes a level of trust when taking a medication that is a pleasing color. It causes you to think that this medication is suited to your desired function and triggers a sensory reminder when you see a different pill.

For instance, many children’s medication are made in pink and  purposely sweetened. The positive association with the taste of pink medication usually makes it easier for a person to ingest other pink products such as pills. On the other hand, red tablets tend to be associated with a bitter taste.

November 8, 2016

What are Reliable Tests for Ovarian Cancer?

Filed under: health,ovarian cancer — Tags: , , , , — jpestano @ 8:46 pm

The human body is entirely made up of cells. These cells grow and divide at a steady rate as the body develops. However, the DNA that makes up these cells gets damaged or changed, resulting in a DNA mutation. A possible outcome of these mutations is that the cells cause growth in an area that body does not require it. This extra tissue developed by the cells is called a tumor.

Furthermore, when these cells continue to divide and cannot be controlled by the body, they are classified as a cancer. Cancer in the ovaries begins as a cyst, which is a collection of fluid, found inside of the ovary. There are two kinds of cysts that are found inside the ovary: benign and malignant. Benign cysts are a natural process and are often found at some stages of the female’s lifetime (usually during the egg release). However, if the cysts is made of malignant, cancerous cells, there is a risk that it may spread throughout the body.

Although there are many screening tests being developed, there is an absence of reliable tests that can promise effective results. Medical professionals use pelvic exams, ultrasounds and advanced blood tests to determine if the patient has Ovarian cancer or not. These tests are usually performed when a person exhibits difficulty eating, bloating, pain in the pelvic or abdominal areas and the urgency or frequency of urinating [1]. Early ovarian cancer often cause no symptoms and if they do, these symptoms are normally caused by something else [2]. Most of the time, there are no observable symptoms of ovarian cancer until it is more advanced.

[1] Detection. Ovarian Cancer Canada. Retrieved From: http://www.ovariancanada.org/about-ovarian-cancer/detection

[2] Can ovarian cancer be found early? American Cancer Society. Retrieved from: http://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovariancancer/detailedguide/ovarian-cancer-detection