December 7, 2016

What You Need To Know About Multiple Sclerosis

Orange Multiple Sclerosis ribbon painted on face

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease in the central nervous system of the human body. The disease causes an inflammation in the protective covering of the nerves, called myelin, and often causes permanent damage to this covering. The myelin sheath is what transmits nerve impulses through nerve fibers. If damaged, the ability for nerves to signal to each other may be compromised and cause irreversible disability.

Although researchers have spent many decades researching this condition, they have not been able to discover a concrete cause for this disease. As of now, there is still research that is being done in order to determine the lifestyle, environmental, genetic and biological factors that contribute to this complication. Studies have shown that MS is more common in women (3 times more likely) and of people with a northern European background. It is usually diagnosed between the ages of 15-40.

Furthermore, this disease can be classified into different types divided by patient experience. For instance, relapsing remitting MS, is the type of MS where patients face the inflammation in episodes of varied length (usually from a few days to a few months) followed by periods of recovery, where many symptoms return. This is the most common form of MS, affecting 85% of patients. Progressive MS is when the symptoms continually increase in magnitude and result in permanent loss of functions.

There is no proven cure for MS. However, there are many forms of treatment that are being researched and deliberated each day. Research is concentrated on the viability of potential therapies, improving imaging technology to understand the brain better, and learning more about cause and risk factors.

Sources:

What is MS? Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada. Retrieved from: https://mssociety.ca/about-ms/what-is-ms

November 8, 2016

What are Reliable Tests for Ovarian Cancer?

Filed under: health,ovarian cancer — Tags: , , , , — jpestano @ 8:46 pm

The human body is entirely made up of cells. These cells grow and divide at a steady rate as the body develops. However, the DNA that makes up these cells gets damaged or changed, resulting in a DNA mutation. A possible outcome of these mutations is that the cells cause growth in an area that body does not require it. This extra tissue developed by the cells is called a tumor.

Furthermore, when these cells continue to divide and cannot be controlled by the body, they are classified as a cancer. Cancer in the ovaries begins as a cyst, which is a collection of fluid, found inside of the ovary. There are two kinds of cysts that are found inside the ovary: benign and malignant. Benign cysts are a natural process and are often found at some stages of the female’s lifetime (usually during the egg release). However, if the cysts is made of malignant, cancerous cells, there is a risk that it may spread throughout the body.

Although there are many screening tests being developed, there is an absence of reliable tests that can promise effective results. Medical professionals use pelvic exams, ultrasounds and advanced blood tests to determine if the patient has Ovarian cancer or not. These tests are usually performed when a person exhibits difficulty eating, bloating, pain in the pelvic or abdominal areas and the urgency or frequency of urinating [1]. Early ovarian cancer often cause no symptoms and if they do, these symptoms are normally caused by something else [2]. Most of the time, there are no observable symptoms of ovarian cancer until it is more advanced.

[1] Detection. Ovarian Cancer Canada. Retrieved From: http://www.ovariancanada.org/about-ovarian-cancer/detection

[2] Can ovarian cancer be found early? American Cancer Society. Retrieved from: http://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovariancancer/detailedguide/ovarian-cancer-detection