January 4, 2017

New Drug Promises Relief for Uveitis Patients

Filed under: health — Tags: , , , , , , , — jpestano @ 6:55 pm

7137093023_2365c21798_zUveitis is known to be a very painful condition that causes severe inflammation in the middle layer of the eyeball. There are many conventional treatments for this disease, beginning with an action as simple as using anti-inflammation eye drops to performing eye surgery in very extreme cases.

In June of 2016, an immune-suppressing drug, Humiria, has received approval to treat uveitis. This drug has been known to provide relief from the burning sensation as a result of inflammation. Although it does not cure uveitis, it is a great relief to many people who experience this condition [1]. According to the lead researcher, Dr. Glen Jaffe, this is the first drug to relieve symptoms of uveitis in FDA history that does not contain steroids [1]. In addition, this drug is able to block the proteins that are the primary cause of the inflammation caused in the eye.

Although the drug does not work towards the treatment of the condition it allows the patient to have some relief when curing the condition with additional medication.

[1] Immune-Based Drug May Ease Chronic Eye Condition. Reinberg, Steven. Health Day. Retrieved From: https://consumer.healthday.com/eye-care-information-13/eye-and-vision-problem-news-295/immune-suppressing-drug-eases-eye-inflammation-condition-714654.html

July 19, 2016

What is Accidental Acetaminophen Overdose?

Filed under: health — Tags: , , , , , , — jpestano @ 1:10 pm

Acetaminophen is a drug that is commonly used as a fever reducer and a pain reliever. Its brand name version, Tylenol, is widely recognized and, in many cases, is used as a substitute for aspirin. It is important that acetaminophen is used in the correct dosage. There is a detailed description that comes with the drug which clearly indicates the safe and beneficial amount for different age groups.

Intentionally or accidentally taking an unsafe dose of acetaminophen  classifies as acetaminophen overdose.  For most people it is recommended that they do not take more than 4000 milligrams of acetaminophen in a 24 hour period. Taking more than this amount can be classified as an overdose. Here are some ways an unintentional overdose can occur:

  • Accidental overdose may occur when a patient takes more than the recommended dose because many patients take more pills if their pain or fever does not go away with the recommended dosage.
  • It is common that many other drugs contain acetaminophen. Combining that dosage with your regular acetaminophen may cause an overdose of acetaminophen in your system.
  • Taking an extended-release form of the pill is another way in which an overdose can occur. An extended release pill causes the medicine to stay in the body longer and in some cases you may have too much in your body at the wrong time.

It is highly advisable that you monitor your doses and take precautionary steps to avoid these overdoses. When you consume a large amount of acetaminophen, your body turns it into a metabolite that is toxic to your liver. As a result, your liver does not effectively eliminate the toxin and it starts cause damage to the organ.

Treatment for acetaminophen overdose largely depends on the amount of time that has passed since the overdose and if the overdose happened all at once, or over a period of time.

Generally acetaminophen overdose is a very serious condition and it can be prevented with extra caution. It always helps to read labels more carefully, taking one type of acetaminophen at a time, taking the correct dosage and not taking the drug too many days in a row.

February 11, 2011

The Female Equivalent

Filed under: remedies — Tags: , , , , , — patt @ 11:46 pm

Viagra was first approved by FDA in 1998 for men with erectile dysfunction; however the research has been slow in creating the female equivalent. Pfizer, a leading medical organization, has been working on the development of a drug that can boost female sexual arousal and increase the chance of orgasms. Statics show that 40% of women are not able to achieve orgasm at some point in their life which creates a possible market for the drug. Although it is still in development, testing of the prototypes have already begun on animal subjects. The most recent study was done by British scientist on rabbits.

The experiment involved stimulating arousal in bunnies and then injecting them with the drug. The results show that the drug blocks an enzyme that checks blood flow to the arousal region. Therefore creates a greater blood flow and increases the arousal in the rabbits. Lead researcher, Christ Wayman states, “When a woman becomes sexually aroused, emotional and physical cues in the brain tell the body to increase blood flow to the genitals; this relaxes the vagina, improves lubrication and increases sensation.” The drug is intended to boost the flow of blood during a situation where arousal has already occurred which creates a greater chance of orgasm. The drug is still in development, according to Pfizer, and will take awhile due to the drug trials. This means that it will take a while before a possible drug for the female equivalent of Viagra to be on the market.